Site not look beautiful? Click here

A&E

Tweeting on the Fringe: An LVLT festival recap

Image
Love Stories During the Armageddon of a Citrus Fruit
Jacob Coakley

@Pandemic! A Killer Flu-sical (by William Ladrop & Robert Williamson/Rag Tag Entertainment) Cute idea, didn’t quite succeed in its satire while adhering to form.

@My Best Dish (by UNLV Senior Adult Theatre Program & Douglas Hill/UNLV SATP) Worked best when authentic voices of creators broke through theatrical exercises, not often enough.

@I Am NOT Batman (by Marco Ramirez/Lil Flo Productions) Batman couldn’t save his parents, but this kid is still trying to save his. 15 minutes of hella awesome. Inspired accompaniment, staging.

@The Blue Hour (by David Mamet/Atlas Theatre) Strong acting choices & deft directing, but Mamet pastiche still borderline parodic.

@Home Free! (by Lanford Wilson/Olde English) Continually threatened incestuous pregnant-sex but still managed to be dull as dishwater.

@Love Stories During the Armageddon of a Citrus Fruit (by Daniel Hamilton/Chaos Theatre) Earnest performers. Some spark. No critical mass. #Lovecraft #thehorrorthehorror #onlylovecansaveus #boom

The Details

Fringe Festival
three stars
Las Vegas Little Theatre

@Casa de Nada (by Erica Griffin/Found Door Theatre) Incredibly gross, hysterical opening gave way to an underdeveloped play. Astounding, brazen cast.

@Sing to Me Through Open Windows (by Arthur Kopit/Butcher Block Productions) A clown, a magician & a young boy … Not a joke, but a tender piece on memory & loss.

@Ruby of Elsinore (by Bruce Kane/LVLT) Broad strokes & insider jokes made this trifle about Hamlet pop. #Gertrude #MILF #yowza

@The Wind in the Willows (adapted by James & Caroline Moran/Endless Productions) Adaptation zipped along with witty staging & great cast. Still chuckling.

@Local Celebrity (by Charles Drew & Lalanya M. Abner/House of Tribes) Show had style to spare, but couldn’t see real conflict under morality lesson.

Share

Commenting Policy

Previous Discussion:

  • The Broadway hit kicked off its first national tour on the Reynolds Hall stage.

  • The three-act comedy considers a late-19th century partnership between two women that may or may not be sexual.

  • Get More Stage Stories
Top of Story