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Taste

One more Bradley Ogden burger before they’re gone

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This is it, your last chance to enjoy Bradley Ogden’s classic burger.
Photo: Beverly Poppe

August 5 marks a sad day in our Valley: the closing of the award-winning Bradley Ogden. The restaurant, which opened in 2003, helped kick off a culinary revival at Caesars Palace that also brought Mesa Grill, Guy Savoy and Rao’s to the property, and for that it should be revered.

The most appropriate way to honor the place in its final days? With a visit (or two), of course. Order extra rounds of the addictive blue-corn muffins, devour the twice-baked Maytag blue cheese soufflé and finish with the complimentary butterscotch pudding. But most of all, you mustn’t miss out on the city’s best burger.

The Details

Bradley Ogden
Caesars Palace, 731-7413.
Wednesday–Sunday, 5-10 p.m. (Closing August 5.)

That $20 burger was put on the national culinary map in 2009, when GQ named it burger of the year. Those in the know, however, had been basking in its brilliance for years. The patty consists of ground trim from ribeye, New York strip and Wagyu steaks, along with ground chuck. It’s cooked in a red wine compound butter over an oak grill, and though it’s served with house-made condiments, there’s no real need for them. All you need is the burger itself. Succulent and smoky, it’s everything a burger should be. And in less than three weeks, it’ll be gone. So get to Caesars now and order a couple. You’ll only be disappointed that you can’t go back.

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Jim Begley

Jim Begley is an avid food lover who began writing about his Las Vegas dining adventures to defray his obscene ...

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